Relative efficacy of human social interaction and food as reinforcers for domestic dogs and hand-reared wolves

Short Synopsis: Social interaction is a relatively ineffective reinforcer compared to food for most dogs and wolves, producing lower responding and longer latencies than food. Authors: Erica N Feuerbacher and Clive D. L Wynne Publication: Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 98(1): 105–129 Publication Date: July 2012 Applies To: Those resistant to using food in training. Sample Size: 6 to 9 dogs, …

The Welfare Consequences and Efficacy of Training Pet Dogs with Remote Electronic Training Collars in Comparison to Reward Based Training

Short Synopsis: Dogs trained using e-collars by e-collar professionals spent significantly more time tense, yawned more often and engaged in less environmental interaction than dogs trained by APDT members without e-collars. There was no difference in urinary corticosteroids between Groups. “Following training 92% of owners reported improvements in their dog’s referred behaviour, and there was no significant difference in reported efficacy …

The acquisition and maintenance of dogs’ aversion responses to kiwi (Apteryx spp.) training stimuli across time and locations

Short Synopsis: Dogs were trained to avoid kiwi birds using shock. 1 year after shock collar conditioning, 87% of dogs continued to leave Kiwi birds alone. “This research indicates that KAT effectively produces aversion towards the KAT stimuli that generalizes to another location, is independent of the electric collar being worn, and that lasts at least 1 year after training.” Authors: Arnja …

Survey of Shock Collar Use in France: Providing Practical Results for Regulatory Guidelines Development

Short Synopsis: 7% of dogs trained with e-collars in France showed burns, only 25% of bark collars were reported as effective, owners describe their dog’s behavior as less excited after e-collar use. The report found differences between different types of e-collars, suggesting need to treat each type separately. “There is an urgent need to regulate use.” Authors: Sylvia Masson, Isabelle Nigron, Emmanuel …

Electronic training devices: Discussion on the pros and cons of their use in dogs as a basis for the position statement of the European Society of Veterinary Clinical Ethology

Short Synopsis: “ESVCE members argue that there is no credible scientific evidence to justify ecollar use and the use of spray collars or electronic fences for dogs. On the contrary, there are many reasons to never use these devices.” Authors: Sylvia Masson, Silviade la Vega, Angelo Gazzanoc, Chiara Mariti, Gonçalo Da Graça Pereira, Christine Halsberghe, Anneli Muser Leyvraz, Kevin McPeak, Barbara …

Obedience training effects on search dog performance

Short Synopsis: “While positive training methods were preferred and were associated with performance success, there was a significant association between the maturation of the dog and the increased use of compulsive methods.” The more time a team trained, the more likely they were to succeed at certification. Authors: Michael Ben Alexandera, Ted Frienda, Lore Haug Publication: Applied Animal Behaviour Science, Volume …

The use of electronic collars for training domestic dogs: estimated prevalence, reasons and risk factors for use, and owner perceived success as compared to other training methods

Short Synopsis: Owner gender and attendance at training classes appear more important for predicting if someone will use an e-collar than the dog’s behavior or demographics, although explaining a relatively small amount of variance between groups. More owners using reward based methods for recall / chasing report a successful outcome of training than those using e-collars. Authors:Emily J Blackwell, Christine Bolster, …

Clinical signs caused by the use of electric training collars on dogs in everyday life situations

Short Synopsis: Beagles didn’t show a big salivary cortisol increase if they were shocked for touching a fake rabbit, but they did if they were shocked for not responding to a “here” command or shocked at random. Results remained the same when trials were repeated 4 weeks later. Authors:E. Schalkea, J. Stichnotha, S. Otta, R. Jones-Baadeb Publication: Applied Animal Behaviour Science, Volume …

Treatment of separation anxiety in dogs with clomipramine: results from a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, multicenter clinical trial

Short Synopsis: Clomipramine improved treatment outcomes for dogs with separation anxiety. Authors: J.N. King, B.S. Simpson, K.L. Overall, D. Appleby, P. Pageat, C. Ross, J. P.Chaurand, S. Heath, C. Beata, A.B.Weiss, G. Muller, T. Paris, B.G. Bataille, J. Parker, S. Petit, J. Wren Publication: Applied Animal Behaviour Science, Volume 67, Issue 4, 19 April 2000, Pages 255-275 Publication Date: April 2000 Applies To: …

The efficacy of systematic desensitization for treating the separation-related problem behaviour of domestic dogs

Short Synopsis: Desensitization to being alone was just as effective as desensitization plus other treatments other things for dogs with separation anxiety. Authors: Rynae Butler, Rebecca J.Sargisson, Douglas Elliffe Publication: Applied Animal Behaviour Science, Volume 129, Issues 2–4, 31 January 2011, Pages 136-145 Publication Date: January 2011 Applies To: Separation anxiety in dogs Limitations/Drawbacks: Link:https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0168159110002923