Let Me Sniff! Nosework induces positive judgement bias in pet dogs

Short Synopsis: The study examines whether giving dogs regular time for “nosework” leads to an improved response when presented with a novel object. The regular nosework resulted in dogs having a more positive outlook; essentially the dogs became more optimistic. The dogs that had regularly practiced nosework had reduced hesitation when approaching an unfamiliar or new object. These results provide …

Should old dog trainers learn new tricks? The efficiency of the Do as I do method and shaping/clicker training method to train dogs

Short Synopsis: Clicker and “Do as I do” performed similarly on simple tasks, but “Do as I do” outperformed clicker training on complex tasks and sequences. Authors: Claudia Fugazza, Ádám Miklósi Publication: Applied Animal Behaviour Science, Volume 153, Pages 53-61 Publication Date: April 2014 Applies To: Training methodology, clicker training versus Do as I Do Sample Size: 30 dogs Limitations/Drawbacks: Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0168159114000264

Relative efficacy of human social interaction and food as reinforcers for domestic dogs and hand-reared wolves

Short Synopsis: Social interaction is a relatively ineffective reinforcer compared to food for most dogs and wolves, producing lower responding and longer latencies than food. Authors: Erica N Feuerbacher and Clive D. L Wynne Publication: Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 98(1): 105–129 Publication Date: July 2012 Applies To: Those resistant to using food in training. Sample Size: 6 to 9 dogs, …

The acquisition and maintenance of dogs’ aversion responses to kiwi (Apteryx spp.) training stimuli across time and locations

Short Synopsis: Dogs were trained to avoid kiwi birds using shock. 1 year after shock collar conditioning, 87% of dogs continued to leave Kiwi birds alone. “This research indicates that KAT effectively produces aversion towards the KAT stimuli that generalizes to another location, is independent of the electric collar being worn, and that lasts at least 1 year after training.” Authors: Arnja …

Electronic training devices: Discussion on the pros and cons of their use in dogs as a basis for the position statement of the European Society of Veterinary Clinical Ethology

Short Synopsis: “ESVCE members argue that there is no credible scientific evidence to justify ecollar use and the use of spray collars or electronic fences for dogs. On the contrary, there are many reasons to never use these devices.” Authors: Sylvia Masson, Silviade la Vega, Angelo Gazzanoc, Chiara Mariti, Gonçalo Da Graça Pereira, Christine Halsberghe, Anneli Muser Leyvraz, Kevin McPeak, Barbara …