Questionnaire survey on the use of different e-collar types in France in everyday life with a view to providing recommendations for possible future regulations

Short Synopsis: 26% of people use E-collars in this survey, mostly with big guard/hunting dogs that were intact. The vast majority of e-collar users (71.8%) used the collar without professional advice, and 75% of e-collar users tried 2 or fewer other solutions before using the collar. Seven percent of the dogs on which the collar was used presented with physical wounds …

Comparison of learning effects and stress between 3 different training methods (electronic training collar, pinch collar and quitting signal) in Belgian Malinois Police Dogs

Short Synopsis: “The electronic training collar induced less stress and had stronger learning effect in comparison pinch collars or quitting signals. It was also noted that quitting signal was markedly stressful in dogs. In the present study, however, theoretical and practical knowledge of each dog trainer could not be achieved during the assessment of pinch collar as well as quitting signal. Therefore, …

The use of shock collars and their impact on the welfare of dogs: A review of the current literature

Short Synopsis: Given the lack of scientific evidence for the efficacy of behavioural modification using shock collars, particularly in the long term, in addition to the potential for mistakes or deliberate abuse and the difficulty in correcting such errors, the widespread use of these devices must be carefully considered. Authors: Emily Blackwell and Rachel Casey Publication: BMC Veterinary Research 8(1):93 Publication Date: …

The Welfare Consequences and Efficacy of Training Pet Dogs with Remote Electronic Training Collars in Comparison to Reward Based Training

Short Synopsis: Dogs trained using e-collars by e-collar professionals spent significantly more time tense, yawned more often and engaged in less environmental interaction than dogs trained by APDT members without e-collars. There was no difference in urinary corticosteroids between Groups. “Following training 92% of owners reported improvements in their dog’s referred behaviour, and there was no significant difference in reported efficacy …

Survey of Shock Collar Use in France: Providing Practical Results for Regulatory Guidelines Development

Short Synopsis: 7% of dogs trained with e-collars in France showed burns, only 25% of bark collars were reported as effective, owners describe their dog’s behavior as less excited after e-collar use. The report found differences between different types of e-collars, suggesting need to treat each type separately. “There is an urgent need to regulate use.” Authors: Sylvia Masson, Isabelle Nigron, Emmanuel …

Obedience training effects on search dog performance

Short Synopsis: “While positive training methods were preferred and were associated with performance success, there was a significant association between the maturation of the dog and the increased use of compulsive methods.” The more time a team trained, the more likely they were to succeed at certification. Authors: Michael Ben Alexandera, Ted Frienda, Lore Haug Publication: Applied Animal Behaviour Science, Volume …

The use of electronic collars for training domestic dogs: estimated prevalence, reasons and risk factors for use, and owner perceived success as compared to other training methods

Short Synopsis: Owner gender and attendance at training classes appear more important for predicting if someone will use an e-collar than the dog’s behavior or demographics, although explaining a relatively small amount of variance between groups. More owners using reward based methods for recall / chasing report a successful outcome of training than those using e-collars. Authors:Emily J Blackwell, Christine Bolster, …

Clinical signs caused by the use of electric training collars on dogs in everyday life situations

Short Synopsis: Beagles didn’t show a big salivary cortisol increase if they were shocked for touching a fake rabbit, but they did if they were shocked for not responding to a “here” command or shocked at random. Results remained the same when trials were repeated 4 weeks later. Authors:E. Schalkea, J. Stichnotha, S. Otta, R. Jones-Baadeb Publication: Applied Animal Behaviour Science, Volume …

Can Aggression in Dogs Be Elicited Through the Use of Electronic Pet Containment Systems?

Short Synopsis: Invisible fences *might* have contributed to unexpected aggressive response in five cases, given that all attacks occured at the boundary of the fence and most of the dogs were shocked during the attack. Authors: Richard Polsky Publication: Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science, Volume 3, 2000 – Issue 4. Pages 345-357. Publication Date: June 04, 2010 Applies To: Aggression, electric fences. …